{{ Burress & Palmer Genealogy }}

Histories

» Show All     «Prev «1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 23» Next»

Granny Spence's Witchcraft solution saves Cousin Flem

Sarah had a 17 year old brother, Flem. The closest neighbor was one we shall not call by name since grandma as well as everybody else said the old woman of the house was a witch....

Note: There was a Josiah and Anne Spence that lived a few house away from the Pack's in the 1850 Census.
 
Granny Spence's Witchcraft solution saves Cousin Flem
 
Sarah had a 17 year old brother, Flem.  The closest neighbor was one we shall not call by name since grandma as well as everybody else said the old woman of the house was a witch.
 
She had several children, one was a girl about the same age as Flem, and she was madly in love with him.  One evening as he walked home she met him and begain to flirt with him.  Flem payed her no mind and left her standing in the road with hurt feelings.  By the time he go home he had a sick headache.
 
Grandma stayed up all night with him.  At her wit's end, she sent for another neighbor, Granny Spence, who was not afraid of witches.  Spence went in to talk to Flem.  She asked Flem if he had made any water since the headache began.  He managed a weak no.  She asked him if he had talked to the neighbor girl.  He said yes, she had given him a bloom from a crab apple tree.  She asked him what he did with it. Flem said he had put it in his shirt pocket.
 
Granny Spence reached over the bed and took it from his pocket.  She then took a new piece of small silver coin from her apron pocket, wrapped the flower around it and swiftly cast them both in the flames of the back log of the fireplace.
 
She told grandma never to take the silver out, always put it back after cleaning the fireplace.  Then she told Samantha to fill the three legged iron kettle with water and let it strike a rolling boil.  She told her to take a tin dipper and pour a dipper at a time on the hearth, spreading it all around slowly, letting it fizzle and pop until it drys each time.  According to Granny Spence, after half the water had been used, the maggots that would have eaten Flem alive would crawl out of the hearth.
 
This grandma did, taking special care to follow Granny Spence's instructions to the letter. Just as the old lady had told her, the wiggly creatures appeared.  Samantha hurried and poured the remaining water on them then swept them up and cast them int the fire.  Granny Spence told her when this part had been done, the guilty party would come and knock on the door and want to borrow something.  She told her not to let her have anything, not even a crumb of bread. 
 
After Samantha had burned the creatures, she went into the bedroom to see how Flem was feeling.  Just then, the wicket neighbor came to the door and knocked.  Grandma opened the door with her big homemade broom in her hand.  The neighbor wanted to know if Samantha could loan her a cup of dry coffee for supper. Anger welled in grandma, she shook the broom at her and told her no, and never to come to her house again.  By the next morning, Cousin Flem was good as new. Shortly after the wicket neighbor moved and was never heard from again.

*Georgia Maud Quesenberry Maxfield, an 80 year old Tazewell resident (deceased), wrote these recollections of early Tazewell County life as told to her by her great-grandmother and her grandmother. Her Recollections appeared in the Tazewell Newspaper

Owner/SourceClinch Valley Newspaper
DateFeb 1986
Linked toMatilda "Tilda" Ann Delong; Fleming "Flem" Pack

» Show All     «Prev «1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 23» Next»